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BIRDLIFE OVERBERG BACK AT MOLLERGREN PARK

Posted on the 23rd February 2022

After all these months of meeting via Zoom and the frustrations of not being able to meet in person we finally returned to Mollergren Park on Monday 21 February. It was great meeting up with old friends (and new ones) and the general consensus was that this was a long time overdue. Die plek het gekook!

A decision was taken that we will discontinue the catering at monthly meetings and that all participant bring their own snacks and drinks. This was again met with approval by the group with several indicating later on that this is the way to go. We will continue with this arrangement and participants will make cash donations towards the rental of the hall and the costs of guest speakers. Kindly note that we can still only allow limited numbers of participants to attend, so ensure that you confirm participation.

Anton presented a celebration of the Cape Gannet as the BLSA Bird of the Year 2022 even though there were some technical problems initially. The group did however continue along its merry, social way until it was possible to present the talk. Those members who could not attend are most welcome to contact Anton by email and a recording of the talk will be forwarded with WeTransfer.

Carin then gave a little speech and presented Anton with a “Bird Nerd” hat that he will use to protect his bolding head on all future club outings


The next talk is scheduled for Monday 14 March when Theuns Kruger will enlighten us with his ongoing research on the marvels of Sandwich Tern migration. An article on this was published in the most recent edition of African Birdlife and Theuns assured us that he will add findings from the 2021/ 2022 summer into his talk. This is certainly one not to be missed – details will be forwarded soon, so don’t forget to reserve your spot.

Cape Gannets, the BLSA Bird of the year 2022. Image by MC Botha

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Sky-pointing couple. Image by Carin Malan
Anton receiving his hat from Carin

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Cape Gannets in action. Image by Riaan Jacobs

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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