News

IT IS TIME TO VISIT DE MOND NATURE RESERVE

Posted on the 31st December 2013

(This brief report together with brillant images was received this morning. Several images are posted below in large format.
Further detail about De Mond Nature Reserve available at: http://www.capenature.org.za/reserves.htm?reserve=De+Mond+Nature+Reserve
Cape Whale Coast birdfinder route descriptions:
http://www.westerncapebirding.co.za/overberg/routes.php
Previous trip reports by BirdLife Overberg members on visits to De Mond:
http://www.westerncapebirding.co.za/overberg/news/1631/anita_en_hugo_by_de_mond_natuurreservaat
http://www.westerncapebirding.co.za/news/1237/birdlife_overberg_outing_to_de_mond_nature_reserve
Ed.)


Hi Anton,
I decided to forward some images just to illustrate the extent of the number of terns present at the De Mond Nature Reserve at the moment. We arrived just before high tide and as the water came in the terns started gathering on the last bits of available sand. They often took off in flocks that looked like “red-bill quelea curls” high above the mouth. We have never witnessed so many terns in one spot – there were literally four different “roosts”, each with thousands of birds in it. Such a pity that I did not have my new wide angle lens there. Ultimately we could identify Common, Sandwich, Swift, Caspian and Damara Terns.
There were also good numbers of African Black Oystercatchers, Bar-tailed Godwits and Grey Plovers, vast numbers of Common Ringed Plovers, Curlew en Common Sandpipers, as well as Common Whimbrels. We were surprised that many White-fronted Plovers were still breeding.
There were also lots of birds at the picnic area. The first bird we saw was a Southern Tchagra, followed by Southern Boubou, Water Thick-knee, a lovely juvenile Cape Robin-Chat, etc. etc.
We took the second turn-off to De Mond along the Arniston road and the pans along this road were still inundated, all with vast numbers of water birds. We also found large numbers of Jackal and Steppe Buzzards, as well as many White Storks. The low-water bridge just before De Mond Nature Reserve is reached had large numbers of Greater Flamingos, Glossy Ibis, Bishops, Coots, Black-winged Stilts, and hunting Whiskered Terns. We also witnessed a fantastic display of a Black Harrier quartering along the road close to the Vogelgezang Farm.
Unbelievably we were able to count 119 species from Bredasdorp to (and including) De Mond Nature Reserve – not bad for four hours of birding!
Text and images by Carin and Dawid Malan.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Whiskered Tern
Cape Robin-Chat immature

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Dawid at work
Terns, terns, terns

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

COMMENTS

1698
JANE IRVINE (posted: 2013-12-31 09:55:02)
Wonderful pictures wish we could be out there.